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digital design

(Atari: hitting targets and giving people what they want)

 

+++I had a great training session recently on Human Centered Design, it was great for many reasons, but among the top was that the audience was filled with Gen-Yers who thought it was all bloody obvious. The general Y-consensus seemed to be: of course you should design with the end-user in mind and arguments from the audience members burst out on why companies bothered employing people who didn’t already “get it”. The arguments seemed to centre on one idea: if people needed to have this drilled into them then they were lazy fools and shouldn’t have a job.

+++This wholehearted embracing of Human Centered Design (HCD) was as abrupt and brutal as it was refreshing. Yes, HCD is a great framework. And the concepts that sit behind it are so simple and straight forward that people should surely be already doing this. But it also isn’t. The majority of people I’ve worked with in behemoth-sized companies are certainly not fools. They might lose sight of the big picture, or be forced into strange KPIs; but generally they are all keen on being decent human beings and look to be part of positive, productive projects. So, why do we so often lose sight of the fundamentals? Even the good basic principals of HCD ?

+++The further I get into my Social Psychology course the more I wonder if it is simply that the way we’ve set up our large companies is not ‘human’ enough? That is, our enterprises themselves are often not based on HCD, so often they don’t take employees’ natural behaviour as a way of building out strengths in the business. And to the Gen Y argument, what is it about extra-large companies that seems to bring out more of the social loafer1 in people? Could it be that the way we organise large workplaces and collaboration is simply failing?

+++Groups can often create situations where Read More

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It seems that every day we get told that there is a digital revolution afoot, and in the advertising industry, the nature of this revolution certainly changes depending on who is trying to sell what to you.

The advertising-hive-mind is now making noise around the idea of bring back one:one value, through fancy digital tools.  So I thought it was time to wriggle free from the shackles of cynicism and take a big-picture look into what ‘value’ revolution might actually be going on in the consumer landscape and the product shifts that may need to accompany it.

Basing this exploration on leading business thinkers, seemed to be a good idea for getting broader perspectives; so I’ve explored a key concept from the erudite Shoshanna Zuboff around how we can create value for consumers in our contemporary space.

The thoughts in the below presentation are based on applying her notes on a broader economic topic to our digital consumer context.

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In a great presentation at Web Directions South 11, Mike Kuniavsky explored the curious revolution of ubiquitous computing. Embedding powerful information processing technology into anything is becoming so cheap that it’s almost free and the implications of this are huge.

The cloud and uber portable computers (i.e. your phone) are just the tip of the iceberg. Kuniavsky:
“when something becomes cheap enough, when cost passes a certain tipping point, it quickly joins the toolkit of things we create our world with.”

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