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social media

youtube_frustrations

I’ve just come out of great session at Google HQ down-under. I’ve been one of the lucky few to see the first study in Australia around the effectiveness of pre-roll and their impact on lowering CPAs.  And I’m not talking CPA as in Cost Per Action, I’m talking the holy grail of Cost Per Acquisition; real buyable things, people who’ve been actively influenced to go and purchase items, expressly because they’ve seen an ad on youtube in the last 30 days.

The study has been conducted in the US a number of times, and we’ve seen broad benchmarks of 5-25% increased probability to purchase after seeing a pre-roll. Interestingly the Australian results are starting to show even higher results of 25-30%^.  As this is the first study, it is impossible for us to conclude higher de-facto effectiveness of pre-rolls in Australia.  But, at the very least we can confirm a positive impact on the consumer journey – another clear win for video!

We also saw that a greater frequency than one proved to be more effective (naturally! who listens the first time around anyway?). But we are yet to see where that tipping point of diminishing returns is; it will be interesting to see if it follows the golden rule of 3 we see across TV.

Speaking of TV, we know that digital is not a silo. We know it amplifies the effect of more tradition medias of  television, print, direct mail, and word of mouth.^^ We also know that the consumer journey is no longer a linear path, but more of a flight map.  Where people jump back and forth between different sources before landing on a purchase decision.  The question is, which sources can we effectively influence?  And, what is the most effective Read More

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socky conversations

Last night a friend posed a question:  Really, how useful is the recent #cockinasock campaign?  If it’s ultimate aim was really to generate conversation around testicular cancer, is it actually doing the cause any good?

As fan of great (branded) social content, my instinctual response was a resounding yes!  The #cockinasock has that elusive golden formula: mass niche appeal.  If anything was ever going to be primed to ‘go viral’ this would be it! It is not only immensely shareable and humorous; it also appeals to a wide variety of disparate audiences.  How often is that you can get this litany of tribes to engage with the same content:

Males from both the Straight and Gay exhibitionist category…

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The tl;dr research notes are (hopefully) de-nerded summaries of interesting (nerdy) research pieces I’ve come across.  

IDC Prediction: Social media technologies will become key arsenal in the marketing toolkit and the technology budgets to come from the CMO Office

Social media face

Social media in 2013 will mature from being a simple basic tool of engaging with customers to a more advanced marketing tool.

Uptake of social media technologies in enterprises was stronger in 2012 with 42% of the companies surveyed stating that they already have deployed it.¨

The social media priorities in B2B marketing are to build market awareness, engage customers or prospect in real-time interactions, acquire information, exchange ideas, and gather customer feedback.¨

tl;dr says: Social media is allowing consumers to talk directly to brands, this “bottom up” feedback needs to integrate into product development and can help growth hacking efforts Read More

On Sunday the Steve Irwin set sail from Circular Quay, the Sea Shepherd’s skull and cross bones drawing the attention of tourists, hippies, grey nomads and yuppies alike. And it got me thinking about advertising activism, and how you successfully get public engagement on a Sunday.

Circular Quay is such a high visibility space, on a daily basis 36,000 visitors* pass through the quay itself with hundreds more looking on from the surrounding restaurants. In a space like this, social activism gets exposure to audiences that may never otherwise seek out information on the causes of the Sea Shepherd. While docking the Steve Irwin in the most famous international port of Australia certainly makes a visual splash, does it make the cause more accessible?

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This intended as a bit of a memes 101, originally written for a senior management man who wasn’t quite sure what all the fuss was about.  So this little article was born, because everyone deserves to understand our little meme friends.

A meme can be any idea that gains popularity, and it’s a slightly different take on what the traditional marketing guys may label as “buzz” or “hype” as it’s (usually) user-generated content that acts in a dialogue with the complex inter-textual network of a peer group or hyperlocal community. The most visible “memes” usually take form of appropriated images with captions: perhaps it’s to make a pithy comment on issues, express pet annoyances or just done for a laugh… some are quite layered and clever, others are not. There is not one main source for image memes. Anyone who has something (or nothing) to say can make one. And anything can become a “mainstream” meme.

image: meme - High Expectations Asian Father

High Expectations Asian Father

Most memes don’t explain themselves very well — you have to know how to read them, and you most likely have to look at several examples before you “get” the joke or the internal language. However, memes are increasingly entering mainstream dialogues and take many forms. Christina Xu and Christian Twang started ROFLCon in 2008, a deep dive conference into internet culture. They’re unofficially considered by many to be the official internet-meme mum and dad, the ones who started it all.  But, that’s the beauty of memes, they can’t really be owned by anyone.  They are live beasts that constantly evolve and by their nature are uncontrollable and roam free…. Read More